More and more consumers become independent from public supply networks

Energy turnaround, financial crisis and rising electricity prices lead to the development of decentralized structures in the energy sector. All over the world, municipalities, medium-sized companies and private households become independent from public supply networks, thanks to solar power they have generated themselves. According to DEGERenergie, global market leader for solar tracking systems and inventor of the patented MLD technology, this trend has gained momentum in the last few months.

The energy of the future is green and it is generated where it is consumed. This is made possible not least thanks to small-scale units for the generation of solar energy with several properties that are advantageous in the complicated times we live in. They are manageable and easy to control, do not require expensive network infrastructures and render the consumer independent from political and economic uncertainties and rising energy prices.

This is particularly interesting against the background of the striking global upheavals of this decade: Fukushima and the energy turnaround, rising public debt, the financial crisis, the emergence of China as the next economic powerhouse, the rapidly rising energy demand along with the increasing exploitation of fossil fuels.

And additionally, there is the increasing skepticism of the people about "huge" solutions. In this respect, there is currently a highly controversial discussion about the massive expansion of the existing electricity infrastructure and the consequently increasing energy prices.

This discussion, by the way, is particularly controlled by the large energy suppliers and usually does not consider the fact that decentralized and local generation of solar energy for self-supply is no longer a problem with today?s technologies. The only requirement: Solar energy generation becomes more efficient and decentralized structures are developed quickly without hesitation. Thanks to a solution like this, huge and expensive power lines, for example to transport energy from offshore wind parks in the North Sea to southern Germany, are no longer necessary.

Today, even the storage of generated solar energy, which is often mentioned as an unsolved problem, can be realized under economically acceptable conditions. It is necessary to guarantee energy supply even when no solar energy can be generated: in the night or under unfavorable weather conditions.

Even today, Artur Deger has developed a feasible solution based on his MLD technology. The installation in Schopfloch, a community located in the German Black Forest, works with conventional solar modules in combination with DEGERenergie solar tracking systems and storage units.

Thanks to this combination, the DEGERenergie founder and CEO each year generates around 6,000 kilowatt hours on a collector surface of not more than 22 qm². This way, he covers the demand of his office, private household and two electric vehicles and becomes largely independent of the public supply network. Thanks to modern storage solutions, power failures or periods when the sun does not shine are not an issue.

The total gross costs of the facility are about 25,000 Euros. In other words: Artur Deger has made the dream of many energy customers come true for himself: a stable electricity price for 25 years on today?s level. This calculation includes all costs: The system itself, financing, maintenance and servicing.

And so it has been proven: Generation of energy for self-supply with photovoltaic tracking technology and respectively independence from public energy suppliers and there prices is possible already today - and at an absolutely attractive price,

However, not only in Germany, there is a trend of decentralized generation of solar energy. In other regions in the world it is indispensable, as there basically is no practical alternative. Particularly in sparsely populated areas, it is not possible to set up a comprehensive grid that would reach all consumers. On the one hand, this would be too expensive in the face of empty state coffers and on the other, expanding the grid would simply take too long.

For instance in India, structural deficiencies are driving the trend of decentralization. There is a lack in capacity as well as in necessary infrastructure. In Australia, however, particularly the transport of electricity is a problem. More and more consumers in the Australian outback and in other remote areas are replacing their diesel generators with solar installations.

Anyway, according to the observations of DEGERenergie, in many regions in the world there is a growing interest in self-generated solar energy and alternatives to the public supply network. This concerns private households and farmers as well as medium-sized companies and, increasingly, also municipalities and other public institutions.

Irrespective of the current political discussions, Germany once more takes a pioneering role in this area. Although subsidies guaranteed by the government have been reduced as of January 1, 2012, the government still offers targeted subsidies for solar energy generation for self-supply and operation of small-scale units. In the meantime, tariff structures with the same logic are also planned in Spain and Canada and in 2013, Italy plans to introduce a tariff following the German example.

MLD technology for the highest yield

Whether for political, economic or ecological reasons and whether for private households, companies or municipalities - when a decision in favor of solar energy is made, each supplier wants to get the highest return for his investment. For this reason, DEGERenergie?s MLD tracking systems are the first choice for many investors. Thanks to this technology, yields can be increased by up to 45 percent compared to fixed systems.

And this news goes around. An ever growing number of municipalities contact DEGERenergie, that, in order to become independent of the rising energy prices in the long run, operate or plan small and medium-sized solar parks, for example on conversion areas like former landfill sites.
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Posted by Gloria Llopis | 2012-04-23