Australia strongly accelerates the energy turnaround

The Australian government is planning to reduce the country?s CO2 emissions by a minimum of 160 million tons by 2020 - this decision was made in early November. As a consequence of the legally stipulated shift towards renewable energies, DEGERenergie is expecting a major surge in demand for its MLD tracking systems on the Australian market. In early November, DEGERenergie has put its production facility in the Australian state of Victoria into operation.

To make these ambitious CO2 reductions possible, the Australian government will take two very effective actions: First, a carbon tax is to be introduced in July next year and second, ten billion Australian Dollars will be invested to support companies and projects committed to ?green? technologies.

According to Christopher Seng, international sales manager of DEGERenergie, the carbon tax will increase the appeal of alternative energy generation to investors and self-suppliers in the years to come: ?The worldwide most efficient way to generate clean solar energy is to use MLD tracking systems from DEGERenergie. That?s why we expect the demand for our tracking systems in Australia to rise considerably in the years to come.?

To be able to best cater to the expected rising demand from Australian customers, DEGERenergie has put its production facility in Wodonga, Victoria into operation in early November. Currently, DEGERtraker systems of the types 5000HD and 6000NT are being manufactured here, with the first batch already being sold.

Christopher Seng: ?With its ?Clean Energy Future? initiative, the Australian government takes the lead in terms of the global energy turnaround. This is all the more remarkable since the local renewable energy market has recently been shaken up by drastically reduced feed-in tariffs and general uncertainty. Now, market observers and investors are expecting a steady and healthy growth of the industry. We are convinced that our MLD technology will play a crucial role here.?

Australian energy providers have already reacted to the new carbon tax, with some of them raising their prices by more than ten percent in the past weeks. Christopher Seng: ?For the next years, local experts expect the price for energy from public grids to increase by around 10 percent per year. This is making grid parity, the moment when the cost of self-generated energy equals that of energy from the grid, move closer quickly. It is highly probable that, in the near future, renewable energy will be cheaper than conventionally generated electricity.?

In addition to the carbon tax, the Australian government has decided to introduce a Clean Energy Finance Corporation (CEFC), which is to be backed up by financial support amounting to 10 billion Australian Dollars. Function of the CEFC will be to support and fund projects committed to the development and commercialization of ?green? technology. Relevant in this context are above all the fields of renewable energy, systems for the efficient use of energy as well as the reduction of CO2 emissions. The launch of the CEFC is scheduled for 2013 or 2014 and investments are planned for companies and projects relying on such technologies and/or business models dedicated to the corresponding objectives.

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Posted by Gloria Llopis | 2011-11-15